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NEWCA Webinar with R. Mark Hall - Shared screen with speaker view
Katie Levin (she/her)
17:00
I see your whole browser window
Tirabassi Katherine
20:29
https://tinyurl.com/rmarkhall
Tirabassi Katherine
33:18
https://tinyurl.com/rmarkhall
Melissa Kleinschmidt
42:19
Empathy
Lauren Hornberger
42:25
“people skills” prioritized over knowledge of writing conventions
Katie Levin (she/her)
42:39
These all feel like, for lack of a better analogy, being a catcher/receiver?
Heather Fitzgerald she/her
42:43
equity and access / inclusion
Katie Levin (she/her)
42:49
Responding to what others offer/bring
Tom Deans
43:03
Right, more about dispositions than defined knowledge
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
43:04
Prioritizing; curiosity; listening actively; flexibility; collaboration; flexibility/adaptability
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
43:18
Hi, Mark!
Kyle Barron
44:29
I love the theme of empathy, responsiveness, and attention to care (writers often need an ear more than they really need "WRITING HELP")
Katie Levin (she/her)
44:52
Co-sign, Kyle
Heather Fitzgerald she/her
45:21
relationality over content knowledge
Tom Deans
45:28
Lots of priority on affective/emotional, even more so than cognitive?
Lisa Jolicoeur
46:07
Active and dynamic - definitely not static - There is constant engagement: speaking, listening, thinking, supporting, etc.
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
46:44
Another pattern: consultants value and prioritize learning
Heather Fitzgerald she/her
47:18
yes, learning and reflection
Kyle Barron
47:21
I also really liked the comment about understanding limits (reflected in a few different comments in other ways)--leads to tutor learning/understanding of genre--instead of positioning as an expert, they can provide resources and help the writer build metacognition through working through their prompt or project. I'd call this a major competency for good tutoring
Jack Kenigsberg (he/him)
47:56
It has implications for hiring practices too, and what qualities to look for in prospective tutors
Kelli Custer
48:08
I'd add confidence/a sense of self-efficacy, both through training and experience. That's related to the "oh, this job is different than I thought."
Tirabassi Katherine
49:34
^yes, Kelli!
Tirabassi Katherine
49:51
My tutors set goals this semester and gaining confidence was a clear theme
Sherry Wynn Perdue
50:44
I’ve also opined that theB+ writer often makes for a better consultnat
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
51:55
In response to Mark’s question: We’re in the process of revising our position description for undergrad consultants. The revised PD includes “familiarity with conventions of academic writing” but there’s more emphasis on experience working with others from diverse backgrounds, listening attentively, asking thoughtful questions, and understanding of student success from a variety of perspectives.
Jack Kenigsberg (he/him)
53:05
I have recently starting asking prospective tutors about times they sought help or feedback, formally or informally. It's been eye-opening in some ways
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
58:49
We’re a writing studio (not appt-based, and located in a large space in our library) where we hope students will spend time working on whatever they’re working on (engineering, physics, writing, etc), and when they have writing, they call us over for a consultation. Regarding recruitment, one of our strategies is to approach students who regularly spend time in the Studio and use the Studio in ways that support their writing and learning. I’ve had some success recruiting new consultants this way.
Al DeCiccio
01:06:28
Kate and Mark, thank you for today. I have to go to a 3:30 meeting with the dean at our university. I do want to say that your point about tutoring and writing center work being something one does for a lifetime works for me since, at 67, I'm still tutoring and doing writing center work. So many ideas: for instance, the point Jack made about the high-achieving students having difficulty understanding those with whom they'd work might not be as driven reminds me of the lament I've heard from some faculty through the years who lament the abilities of the students they teach. Then that makes me think that wat people brought up in the Google exercise highlighted competencies that makes the writing center transgressive. Thanks everyone!
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:06:37
This also makes me wonder how cllients/writers are themselves part of (or Venn Diagrammed with?) a writing center CoP—frequent flyers, in particular, learn more about how to use the WC, to talk about their writing with somebody else? (This gets to my revision to North: I want us not to say “better papers” OR “better writers”; rather, I want people to become “better users of the writing center.”)
Tirabassi Katherine
01:06:54
Thanks for joining us, Al!
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
01:07:12
We just had an all-staff meeting about how the language we use to talk about our work, about writers, about writing, and about learning shapes how we understand those things. Our activity included a bit of analysis about language we hear ourselves use regularly and don’t necessarily reflect on. We see consultants talking about having an “easy” session, for example. What does that mean? Is it “easy” because the writer’s paper adhered to to all the conventions of academic writing? Was it “easy” because the writer allowed the consultant to do most of the talking? And what about the “tough” consultations? What does that mean? And so on. It was a nice meeting topic.
iPhone
01:07:50
this is a fantastic conversation. is it being recorded? I'm unfortunately on school pick up duty right now and can't take notes!
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:07:59
^it is!
Tirabassi Katherine
01:08:20
Yes it’s being recorded
iPhone
01:10:00
thanks!
Sherry Wynn Perdue
01:10:30
Thank you Mark for an engaging query. Thank your Kate for hosting. And thank you everyone else for such a lively discussion. Unfortunately, the Provost awaits. Good Bye!
Tom Deans
01:10:33
But do Lave and Wegner say that no learning happens outside of COPs and/or the process of participation? I’m largely sympathetic to that, but I think I’ve learned plenty in straight-up classroom instruction too…and when we send PhD students into the lonely wilderness for nearly a year to do their reading lists for PhD exams, they still learn, no?
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:11:32
(This is also why I love when clients apply to become consultants)
Nicole Cunningham-Frisbey
01:11:43
As someone still doing their exams yes and no. I think my mind does a bit of data-dump when I don’t apply half the stuff I am reading for them :)
Kyle Barron
01:15:35
Have to run to seminar - thanks kindly to everybody involved in putting this together!
Tirabassi Katherine
01:15:47
Thanks for joining us Kyle!
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:16:29
(Sending you empathy, Nicole!)
Nicole Cunningham-Frisbey
01:17:11
Thanks!
Alicia Clark-Barnes
01:20:22
Maybe similarly, how do we reach out to students in need of support during unpredictable times?
Tirabassi Katherine
01:20:44
^yes, Alicia!
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:21:06
Staff meetings that have breakout rooms where consultants teach NON-wc things: bullet journaling, how to draw a dragon, writing together...
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
01:21:12
We’re missing that, as well, Katherine. We’ve tried several approaches, and one was Teams video check ins (among the staff) at the beginning of each hour. But it just didn’t land. I think Zoom fatigue is a challenge—more video conferencing is the potential solution, but one they’re reluctant to engage in more than they already are.
Daniel Brengel
01:23:30
As a new WC coordinator, I inherited a team that was divided between experienced specialists and newer peer tutors. To help address this division and lack of experience in some team members, we have been participating in mentor groups, group projects, and mock tutoring sessions. The newer tutors have reported that they feel much more confident and that their needs are being met. I'm excited to continue building the community learning aspect in this way.
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
01:23:37
But what’s working: (1) weekly Zoom staff meetings with lots of small-group activities; (2) we’re using Teams as our Studio work space, and checking in, debriefing after consultations (via writing in Teams); (3) 1:1 video debriefings following consultations; and (4) 1:1 end-of-term conversations with the consultants.
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:23:58
(US, TOO!)
Tom Deans
01:24:09
Right, Chris, we too tried to nudge the Teams video meets as a regular thing and that faded pretty quickly, but daily Teams activity is at least helping us do some interaction, and while we see how much thinner this is than in past (live) years, tutors are telling us that the WC is more cohesive and interactive than any of their other campus groups/commitments
Tirabassi Katherine
01:24:36
Yes ,Tom us too—We’ve found that tutors are willing to engage in staff connection activities through Teams chat
Genie Giaimo
01:24:37
Not sure if this is helpful but these are a lot of pedagogical activities offered in this edited collection that recently came out (shameless self-promotion): https://ship.pressbooks.pub/writingcentersandwellness/
Genie Giaimo
01:24:47
there are^
Tirabassi Katherine
01:24:59
Thanks, Genie!!
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
01:26:05
They’re also connecting outside of our space—direct chat via Teams or texting. But I think we needed some time to develop the practices around community building. Just in time to (fingers crossed) begin moving back to in-person, we’re beginning to build our virtual community.
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
01:26:47
I just learned that my consultants have a virtual D&D going now.
Genie Giaimo
01:26:57
That is awesome!
iPhone
01:27:06
my tutors have a group me "+Rowe" and a group me without me!
Patricia Gillikin she/her
01:27:12
YES table-top role-play!
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:27:34
We just had an informal staff development activity where folks could get together and just write—framed it as “here’s how the dissertation retreat works—in case you want to write with a writer in your session!” We used a space at gather.town (free for up to 20 users)—HIGHLY recommend!
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
01:28:10
Oh, yes! Teams ice breakers can be left on the channel throughout the week. I did a “caption the comic” where I loaded a comic with the caption missing, and consultants composed their own captions (like the New Yorker contest).
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:28:41
(I also just want to say it was SO GOOD TO SEE YOUR FACES AND HEAR YOUR VOICES, people I know and people I don’t know, alike—so nice to be among WC people!!)
Genie Giaimo
01:29:24
^^
Tirabassi Katherine
01:29:42
^^yes!
Meaghan Dittrich (she/her)
01:29:45
Thank you very much, Mark! It was wonderful seeing everyone and listening/reading so many generative ideas and responses to the conversation. My toddler is waking up from her nap, so I’m going to depart a little early. Cheers everyone, and have a great weekend!
Tirabassi Katherine
01:30:59
Thanks for joining us Meaghan
iPhone
01:31:06
yes! barely any action on the +Rowe page!
Chris Ervin (he, him) Oregon State University
01:31:29
I have a 1:1 with a consultant coming up on the hour. Thanks so much Mark and Katherine for presenting and hosting and facilitating this conversation. It was really rewarding!
Genie Giaimo
01:31:47
We tried a game night but it failed. Guess sometimes it is a win some lose some approach that helps with that.
Tirabassi Katherine
01:31:58
Thanks for joining us, Chris!
Tirabassi Katherine
01:32:21
Look for more NEWCA events to be announced on the NEWCA website: https://newcaconference.org/
J Taylor
01:32:23
ha ha
Tirabassi Katherine
01:32:47
And our social media (Facebook/Twitter)
Tom Deans
01:33:13
Thanks Mark and all! I’ve got to get to the next commitment
Tirabassi Katherine
01:34:14
Thanks Tom!
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:35:33
I like those questions, and I especially wonder how things will work with a staff that’s partly online, partly in-person.
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:35:39
(So, thank you, J!)
iPhone
01:36:05
thank you!!! this was great!
Daniel Brengel
01:36:09
Thank you!!
Jack Kenigsberg (he/him)
01:36:09
Thank you for a fantastic discussion!
Genie Giaimo
01:36:11
Thanks so much!
Matthew Bryan
01:36:12
Thank you, Mark, so much for this talk, and thank you NEWCA for hosting!
Ashley Barry (she/her)
01:36:14
`Thank you!!
Suzanne Schryver
01:36:17
Thank you!
Jasilyn Heaps
01:36:22
Thank you!
Katie Levin (she/her)
01:36:31
This was FANTASTIC! Thanks for opening this up to folks beyond NEWCA!
Dr. Susan DeRosa
01:36:41
A great conversation! Thank you Mark and everyone for coming!
Rachel Roy (she/her)
01:36:59
Thank you!!